After a long day on the Delaware Bay and the C&D Canal we were settling in for a quiet, peaceful evening with bald eagles circling overhead and an early sundowner in hand. Like distant thunder, a series of low booms rumbled across the bay under clear skies. Rain was in the next day’s forecast; the evening’s forecast for clear skies and light breezes was perfect for a couple of tired bodies. Relaxing in the cockpit we watched as a nesting pair of bald eagles soared above us. We ignored the booming sounds focusing on the cry of the eagles.

The Bald Eagle, a stately symbol of our country, a raptor with eyesight so keen it can spot fish below the surface from high above would certainly have a cry befitting such a predator. A cry that would instill fear, a cry that would match its hunting skill, a deep commanding cry. That would not be the case. Listen. Perhaps Ben Franklin’s choice for the national bird, a wild turkey would have been a more apropos choice, a bird that clucks and struts.

A day of drenching rain followed our traverse of the C&D, a day of welcome rain as we rested from five days of hurried travel covering about 250 nm. We spent the day writing, resting, planning the next legs of our journey and discovering deck leaks. We also discovered a rash on my arm that was becoming infected. A trip to an Urgent Care was in the making. Arriving in Havre De Grace early on Saturday afternoon, we reached the Urgent Care shortly before their closing.

Leaving the clinic with a prescription for an antibiotic and a follow up appointment in two days, we headed to the Susquehanna Seafood Festival at a riverside park. Reggae set the tone for the gathering while attendees sipped wine, danced, and dined on local favorites. The crab cakes from Faidley’s were the best we have eaten, perhaps setting the bar too high for our time on the Chesapeake.

The days waiting for my appointment were filled with a three mile (RT) walk to the nearest pharmacy, hanging out in the marina, waiting for an Instacart delivery from Wegman’s, another beer delivery, and a walk along the riverfront promenade. We also began to plan our journey to the middle Chesapeake and Annapolis.

Our journey south took us first to Still Pond Creek (39.3345°N, 76.1397°W) a few miles down the bay from HDG. On the chart it appeared to be a secluded and well protected anchorage. The approach to the Creek is shallow, narrow and twisting, with no easy escape route to deep water. We chose to anchor in the bay outside the creek. Exploring the creek by dinghy the next day we saw that it was indeed narrow with a couple of very sharp turns, but navigable if taken slowly and with caution. It will be remembered next spring on our way back.

Leaving Still Pond Creek for Magothy River, we left behind a peaceful anchorage and the persistent sounds of explosions in the distance, the sounds of a distant battlefield. The sounds of the Aberdeen Proving Grounds where the Defense Department designs and tests munitions. They blow stuff up.